Engineering Insights 2011

Speakers

John Bowers

John Bowers

Director, Institute for Energy Efficiency
Professor, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

John Bowers holds the Fred Kavli Chair in Nanotechnology, and is the Director of the Institute for Energy Efficiency and a Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at UCSB. He is a cofounder of Aurrion, Aerius Photonics and Calient Networks. Dr. Bowers received his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Stanford University and worked for AT&T Bell Laboratories and Honeywell before joining UC Santa Barbara. Dr. Bowers is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, a fellow of the IEEE, OSA and the American Physical Society, and a recipient of the OSA Holonyak Prize, the IEEE LEOS William Streifer Award and the South Coast Business and Technology Entrepreneur of the Year Award. He has published eight book chapters, 450 journal papers, 700 conference papers and has received 52 patents. He and coworkers received the EE Times Annual Creativity in Electronics (ACE) Award for Most Promising Technology for the hybrid silicon laser in 2007.

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Larry Coldren

Larry Coldren

Acting Richard A. Auhll Dean of College of Engineering
Fred Kavli Professor of Optoelectronics and Sensors

Larry A. Coldren is the Fred Kavli Professor of Optoelectronics and Sensors and acting Richard A. Auhll Dean of Engineering at UC-Santa Barbara, where he holds appointments in Materials and ECE. Following his PhD from Stanford, he spent 13 years in the research area at Bell Laboratories, where he worked on SAW devices and tunable coupled-cavity lasers using novel fabrication techniques. After joining UCSB in 1984, he co-founded VCSEL and widely-tunable transmitter companies that were successfully acquired, and he continues to lead work in efficient, high-speed VCSELs and widely-tunable photonic ICs. Prof. Coldren has authored or co-authored over a thousand conference and journal papers as well as 63 issued patents. He is a Fellow of the IEEE, OSA, and IEE, a recipient of the 2004 John Tyndall and 2009 Aron Kressel Awards, and a member of the National Academy of Engineering.

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Frank Doyle

Frank Doyle

Associate Dean for Research, College of Engineering
Director, Army Institute for Collaborative Biotechnologies

Dr. Francis J. Doyle III is the Associate Dean for Research in the College of Engineering at UC, Santa Barbara and he is the Director of the Army Institute for Collaborative Biotechnologies. He holds the Duncan and Suzanne Mellichamp Chair in Process Control in the Department of Chemical Engineering, as well as appointments in the Electrical Engineering Department, and the Biomolecular Science and Engineering Program. He received his B.S.E. from Princeton (1985), C.P.G.S. from Cambridge (1986), and Ph.D. from Caltech (1991), all in Chemical Engineering. Prior to his appointment at UCSB, he has held faculty appointments at Purdue University and the University of Delaware, and held visiting positions at DuPont, Weyerhaeuser, and Stuttgart University. He is the recipient of several research awards (including the NSF National Young Investigator, ONR Young Investigator, Humboldt Research Fellowship) as well as teaching awards (including the Purdue Potter Award, and the ASEE Ray Fahien Award). He is a Fellow of the IEEE, and a Fellow of IFAC. He served as the editor-in-chief of the IEEE Transactions on Control Systems Technology from 2004-2009, and currently holds Associate Editor positions with the Journal of Process Control, the SIAM Journal on Applied Dynamical Systems, and Royal Society’s Interface. In 2005, he was awarded the Computing in Chemical Engineering Award from the American Institute of Chemical Engineers for his innovative work in systems biology. His research interests are in systems biology, network science, modeling and analysis of circadian rhythms, drug delivery for diabetes, model-based control, and control of particulate processes.

Prof. Doyle’s group works in the field of systems biology, bring systems-theoretic approaches to the modeling and analysis of complex biophysical systems. The biophysical networks they study range from gene regulatory networks to protein signaling networks to intercellular coupling. They have a particular interest in periodic phenomena in nature, such as circadian timekeeping, and bring novel analysis and simulation methods to the treatment of stochastic coupled oscillators. In the medical arena, they work closely with medical partners for clinical trials, and with biologists for experimental studies. They have a large research effort in the area of diabetes, designing an artificial pancreas for subjects with type 1 diabetes, and working to identify novel drug targets for insulin resistance underlying type 2 diabetes. Larger collaborative efforts include modeling tauopathies in Alzheimer’s disease, and biomarker discovery for post traumatic stress disorder.

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Glenn Fredrickson

Glenn Fredrickson

Director, MC-CAM
Director, Complex Fluids Design Consortium

Glenn Fredrickson obtained his Ph.D. at Stanford University in 1984 and subsequently joined AT&T Bell Laboratories, where he was named Distinguished Member of the Technical Staff in 1989. In 1990 he moved to the University of California at Santa Barbara (UCSB), joining the faculties of the Chemical Engineering and Materials Departments. He served as Chair of Chemical Engineering from 1998 to 2001 and in 2001 founded the Mitsubishi Chemical Center for Advanced Materials (MC-CAM) at UCSB. Professor Fredrickson currently holds the Mitsubishi Chemical Endowed Chair in Functional Materials and serves as MC-CAM Director, and Director of UCSB’s Complex Fluids Design Consortium. He has over 230 refereed publications, one book, and 10 patents in fundamental and applied topics related to the statistical mechanics of complex fluids, including polymers, colloids, and glasses. His research is primarily theoretical and has been most recently aimed at developing novel field-based computer simulation strategies for the design of multi-component plastics and consumer product formulations. Honors include the NSF Presidential Young Investigator Award, a Sloan Fellowship, the Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award, the Dillon Medal and Polymer Physics Prize of the American Physical Society, the Cooperative Research Award in Polymer Science and Engineering of the American Chemical Society, the Alpha Chi Sigma Award of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, the Collaboration Success Award of the Council for Chemical Research, and election to the National Academy of Engineering USA.

Professor Fredrickson has consulted for a broad range of companies and law firms in areas related to polymer science and technology. He has chaired Technical Advisory Boards for Dow Chemical, Mitsubishi Chemical, and Allergan Medical. He currently serves on the Scientific Advisory Boards of DSM Corporation and the green chemistry venture firms Segetis and Novomer. In April 2009, he was appointed Executive Director and Member of the Board of The KAITEKI Institute, a strategic advising and research arm of the Mitsubishi Chemical Holdings Corporation, headquartered in Tokyo.

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Umesh Mishra

Umesh Mishra

Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Professor Mishra is a recognized leader in the area of high-speed field effect transistors, and has made major contributions at every laboratory and academic institution for which he has worked, including: Hughes Research Laboratories in Malibu, California; the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor; and General Electric, Syracuse, New York. He is also a fellow of the IEEE, Member of the National Academy of Engineering as well as a recipient of both the IEEE David Sarnoff Award and the ISCS Quantum Device Award. Umesh Co-founded the company Transphorm in 2007, it now develops solutions for energy efficiency and has just received $20 million from Google Ventures to develop power conversion technology.

Professor Mishra's research interests in electronics and photonics include: high-speed transistors, semiconductor device physics, quantum electronics, design and fabrication of millimeter-wave devices, novel integration techniques, Gallium Nitride based electronics, photronics and photo electronics. Prof. Umesh Mishra’s group is working on developing high efficiency multi-junction solar cells using the Indium Gallium Nitride (InxGa1-xN) ternary semiconductor system, the direct band-gap of which spans the entire solar spectrum. Besides the conventional PIN solar cell design, innovative designs such as multiple double-heterostructure (MDH), multiple quantum-well (MQW) solar cells, and N-polar InGaN solar cells with polarization engineering of the absorption region are investigated to improve the efficiency of the solar cells in the untapped 400-500 nm wavelength region of the solar spectrum.

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Giovanni Vigna

Giovanni Vigna

Professor, Department of Computer Science

Giovanni Vigna is a Professor in the Department of Computer Science at the University of California in Santa Barbara. His current research interests include malware analysis, web security, vulnerability assessment, and intrusion detection. He also edited a book on Security and Mobile Agents and authored one on Intrusion Correlation. He has been the Program Chair of the International Symposium on Recent Advances in Intrusion Detection (RAID 2003), of the ISOC Symposium on Network and Distributed Systems Security (NDSS 2009), and of the IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy (S&P 2010 and 2011). He is known for organizing and running the world's largest inter-university Capture The Flag hacking contest, called iCTF, that every year involves dozens of institutions and hundreds of student around the world. Giovanni Vigna received his M.S. with honors and Ph.D. from Politecnico di Milano, Italy, in 1994 and 1998, respectively. He is a member of IEEE and ACM.

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Campus Sponsors:

CNSI MRL
ICB College of Engineering
IEE MC-CAM
SSLEC PICO

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Britta Dysart
(805) 893-5177
Events Manager
College of Engineering